A magnificent window

Brighton Corn Exchange window

Isn’t this beautiful? It is one of the windows at the Brighton Dome Corn Exchange after refurbishment but still awaiting its many of panes of glass (I just counted space for 185 of them). I have repeatedly been drawn to photographing these huge windows while documenting the redevelopment of this beautiful 200-year-old building. They are magnificent in all their guises, even with broken panes and peeling paint, but to finally start to see them renewed is very pleasing indeed.

Cataloguing with my camera the changes that a building like this undergoes during renovation has many satisfying moments. I find a beauty in all stages of the process, the early messy broken phases through to the clean and ordered final stretch. This build still has a long way to go to completion, but it is offering up glimpses of how spectacular the finished product will be. More photographs of the Brighton Dome Corn Exchange can be found here.

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Sideways rainbow found in Eastbourne

Sideways rainbow found in Eastbourne

Following the ‘new’ theme of my previous photo of the week, here is a shot from the new build construction section of my website. As well as photographing the renovation of heritage buildings, I also document all kinds of construction sites. This is the Arndale Centre, a shopping mall going up in Eastbourne. Every month I chart the progress being made for my clients to share with their stakeholders.

I am sure I have said this before in my blog but finding interesting colours on building sites always makes me happy. Getting both colour and reflective puddles at a shoot makes me doubly so. I have found some beautiful, unexpected colours and light at the Arndale Centre during my visits. It is surprising what you can see on a construction site if your eyes are open to it.

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Architectural photography

Architectural photography

About half of the architectural photography that I do is for corporate clients, usually as progress photos of new builds and developments. These projects entail monthly site visits to document how much work has taken place between each shoot. Although the photographs are expected to be a straight-forward record, while I am there I can’t help but look for beautiful light and surprising colours as well.

On one such visit I was intrigued by these markings on a partition wall. Of course they are not an industrial art installation, as I wanted to imagine. Each colour represents a specific completed task, making it easy to know at a glance whether the job has been done, while adding a pleasing pattern of reds, greens, blues and yellows in the process.

Old and new converge

Old and new converge

It seems that just about everyone in Lewes is excited about the Depot Cinema opening soon so I thought I would use another photo from my latest visit. This shot shows the view from the new zinc roof across to the old roofs of the Victorian-era railway station. I was interested in how the colours and the repeating lines of the old and new converge in the purple grey of the late afternoon light.

It is a glimpse of how well the new high-spec modern building will sit within its locality.

I have been documenting the refurbishment of this old brewery depot in the centre of Lewes for a year and a half as it becomes a new community cinema. My client uses the photos to build on the excitement of the local residents and film buffs.

Boot prints and yellow cord

Boot prints and yellow cord

I visited The Depot last Tuesday, a day that turned out to be blisteringly hot. I had to wear my full personal protection equipment, of course (high vis jacket, helmet, boots, jeans), which did nothing to help relieve the intense heat. In an effort to get out of the sun, I made my way to the main building to find a glorious shiny black surface extending across the entire floor in front of me. I was confused at first, thinking it was all just very wet, until I realised this was a thick coating of a waterproof barrier called toughseal. It created a beautiful reflective surface to photograph and gave the interior space a radiant quality.

In one corner I was surprised to find these clear white boot prints across the clean black background. I loved the patterns they made with the tangled yellow electric cord layered across the top.

I am documenting the renovation of The Depot, a former industrial building in the centre of Lewes, as it becomes a new community cinema. My client uses these photographs to promote the project and keep local residents informed about the progress that is being made.

If you have a workplace, building project or event that you are thinking of photographing, please get in touch.

The scaffolding birdcage

The scaffolding birdcage

My photo of the week of a scaffolding birdcage, is an update on the Depot cinema construction site. There is great anticipation in Lewes about this building. For years it was empty and unused once it had become obsolete as a depot for Harvey’s Brewery. Now it is in the throws of transforming into a community cinema. No wonder people are excited about it. I have been hired by the cinema to document the process of the building works. They use my photographs to keep local residents informed and to broadcast the progress being made.

On my latest visit this intricate scaffolding structure, called a birdcage, was being taken down. It was being put up during my last visit a month ago to provide wide areas of continuous access at roof level. I was fascinated with the repeating shapes and angles the birdcage made, which were then reflected in the puddles of water on the floor. At this point in the build everything changes so quickly that it will look very different by the next time I visit with my camera.

If you have a workplace, building project or event that you are thinking of photographing, please get in touch.

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