Idyllic hut in a rural idyll

Idyllic hut in a rural idyll

I’ve been photographing an old grain store on the edge of Lewes as it becomes disabled-access accommodation, located right in the midst of the South Downs National Park. The South Downs Way, the footpath that spans the length of the Park for 100 miles from Winchester to Eastbourne, runs along the ridge in the background of this photo.

Next to the large agricultural building, a little dwelling has sprung up as well. I have been watching this shepherd’s hut take shape over the months and love the way it sits so prettily in its surroundings. On my most recent visit, the sun was low in the sky as evening approached, casting raking light across the site. This made it challenging to photograph but I was interested in the drama it created.

I had to align myself within the shadow of the hut and peer around it with my camera to catch the workmen. You can find more photographs of this lovely project here.

My talk went well at the Lewes History Group last week. I have another one coming up, this time at the Paddock Arts Studios (Paddock Lane, Lewes, BN7 1TW at 3pm). I will be speaking about my project documenting the transition of the old industrial Harvey’s Depot into a state-of-the-art cinema. If you are nearby on the 10th November, please join us.

If you have a building project, workplace or event that you are thinking of photographing, please get in touch.

How to make focaccia

How to make focaccia

After showing you how to pour concrete in my last newsletter, my lessons continue with Genovese focaccia, made the authentic way at Caccia & Tails, our new Italian deli in Lewes. Elisa, the owner, stretched the dough until it was translucent and draping like an opulent piece of fabric. This was a skilled process that I found fascinating to watch. Obviously my single photo cannot teach you the technique needed to try this at home but it may inspire you to ponder the craft of lovingly-made food.

More photographs from this shoot are here. Proof of my fascination with photographing workplaces can be found here. And this is where you can find a gallery of working portraits.

If you have a workplace, project or event that you are thinking of photographing, please get in touch. I deliver photographs that delve deeper than showing just the surface of things.

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A working portrait

A working portrait

I think I should set up a page on my website just for photographs of workers and builders because I find them continually interesting to shoot. This would not be about the specific locations they are working in, glamorous or not. It would be about the skill, the craft and the graft required to work in the building trades. I will let you know when I have set it up. In the meantime, this photo is a candidate for it. Set in

an old cellar in Lewes, the single light casts soft shadows across a room filled with the warm browns of old wood and the cool blue of new plasterboard. Often I am rushing to catch photographs of extreme action on building sites, but here is a different energy of concentration and focus. Until I set up this new gallery page, you can find many photographs of builders working on site in my architectural documentary photographs and more working portraits here.

Crazy red light of Lewes Bonfire

Crazy red light of Lewes Bonfire

After three years as an official photographer for one of Lewes’s Bonfire societies, this year I had intended to experience the celebrations as a spectator. At the last minute I grabbed my camera bag. I couldn’t stop myself. It is hard to resist photographing the extraordinary spectacle of Lewes Bonfire, though the lighting conditions are extreme, to say the least, as is the challenge of dodging exploding bangers. The one disappointment is that a still image can never capture

the overwhelming smells and sounds of the experience. For the full impact you need to be standing in the crush of Lewes High Street as hundreds of wildly, crazily-dressed people stream by holding flaming torches and setting explosives alight. For those of you who have never been here on the 5th of November, I offer this photograph as a mere hint of the full-body experience of the night itself. More photographs of Lewes Bonfire can be found here.

Lewes Bonfire

Lewes Bonfire

Tomorrow our small town of Lewes commemorates Guy Fawkes night with a Bonfire celebration of epic proportions. (When the 5th falls on a Sunday, the festivities take place on the 4th.) This is one of my favourite photos of the event.

I love the conspiratorial relationship between Soldier and Death and find myself pondering what whispered conversation could be taking place. Can a Soldier bargain with Death? Anyone fancy writing the dialogue? More of my Bonfire photos can be found here.

The flower bus has arrived

The flower bus has arrived

A bus made of flowers. To me, a lover of both flowers and public transport, this is a perfect combination! A scaled replica of a double decker bus covered in real flowers was wheeled into the centre of Lewes one Friday morning – in the middle of the road, along with other traffic, of course. The wooden structure was constructed off

site, followed by a labour-intensive two days of work by florists Katie and Becky before the flower bus was ready to roll. I could not resist photographing this quirky, colourful project. You can see more photographs of celebrations here. The bus was commissioned by our local bus company as part of the Lewes Artwave Festival of artists and makers.

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